Archive for the ‘Events: Toronto’ Category

DIASPORA VOICES, CARIBBEAN CONNECTIONS: REFLECTING THE CARIBBEAN IN TORONTO 


October 25, 2009

DIASPORA VOICES, CARIBBEAN CONNECTIONS: REFLECTING THE CARIBBEAN IN TORONTO 
 A ONE-DAY STUDENT SYMPOSIUM,

MARCH 6 2010,

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Multi Faith Centre, 569 Spadina Avenue, Toronto

CALL FOR PAPERS The Conference Organising Committee invites students from any tertiary institution in the Toronto area, and any discipline or field, to participate in the U of T Caribbean Studies Programme’s second one-day, student-organised, interdisciplinary conference on the Caribbean and its diaspora. Now in its second year, this annual conference offers a vital public venue to highlight, discuss and celebrate the work and ideas of students interested in the Caribbean. All students, faculty and friends of the Caribbean Studies Programme at the University of Toronto, and members of the college and university community and the public are invited to attend and participate in the conversation. The primary organisers and most of the participants are students themselves (with faculty and staff support).

This conference gives organisers and participants the opportunity to gain invaluable organising experience and a chance to get a glimpse of what it might feel like to pursue a career in academia. Additionally, it creates a unique space for community interaction, self-empowerment and networking. All of the work submitted will be considered for possible publication. We seek proposals and submissions from any of the following people or groups: – tertiary-level students across Toronto who have written a paper on a Caribbean topic, and who wish to share their work with a wider community of interested people. Term papers, book/film reports, or any other analytical format are welcome. – students who want to share and reflect upon their experiences as part of practicum or fieldwork training in the Caribbean, or with Caribbean communities in Toronto. – authors of spoken word poetry, prose, music, visual arts, and short ‘think’ pieces, whose work is relevant to the conference. The work of visual or installation artists will be featured as part of an art exhibit. All artists selected will be invited to perform and discuss their work as part of a special session of the conference focusing on the arts and the artistic process. – presenters/proposals for a special session entitled “Beyond the Classroom” which highlights the work of young, community organizers and activists who are making important contributions to building and sustaining community life in the Toronto Caribbean community. – graduate students who would like to participate as either presenters on our graduate student panels or panel facilitators/chairs. Academic presentations should be approximately 10-12 minutes long. Presenters of artistic pieces are also encouraged to work within this time frame. Based on the submissions which we receive we will group the papers into panels with general themes. The conference takes place on
March 6 2010, with a deadline for proposals and submissions on February 7 2010.

Submissions/proposals should be a summary of your work not exceeding 300 words in length. If yours is an artistic piece then you may submit the entire work. All submissions should include a title; the individual’s name and institution; a telephone number and an email address. Refreshments and lunch will be served. We will have some limited childcare available with experienced childcare providers, but spaces are limited. Those in need of childcare in order to facilitate their involvement in the conference are strongly encouraged to make arrangements with the COC ahead of time.

For more information please contact any of the following COC members: Samantha Peters, MA Candidate, Social and Equity Studies (s.peters@alumni.utoronto.ca) Melanie Newton, Department of History and New College (melanie.newton@utoronto.ca/ 416-978-4054) Members of the Conference Organising Committee: Lenore Butcher (Undergraduate); Chantal Persad and Claire-Hélène Heese-Boutin (Undergraduates and Caribbean Studies Students Union representatives) Sharifa Khan, Samantha Peters, Latania Christie (Graduate) Melanie Newton, Alissa Trotz (Faculty advisors)

The History of Cuban Culture Through Documentary Films (Oct 23)

October 16, 2009

The History of Cuban Culture through Documentary Films
Jackman Humanities Building 10th floor meeting room
Time: Oct 23rd, 2:00 pm End: Oct 23rd, 4:00 pm
Interest Categories: Spanish & Portuguese, Political Theory, Marxist, Latin American, Information, Humanities (UTSC), History, Historical Studies (UTM), English and Drama (UTM), English, Critical Theory, Communications, Communication and Culture (UTM), Cinema, Caribbean, Art, Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology, 2000-, 1950-2000
Lecture by Maria Caridad Cumana Gonzalez (University of Havana, Fundacion del Nuevo Cine Lationoamericano)

María Caridad Cumaná González (University of Havana, Fundación del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano)

Professory Cumaná’s talk will present a unique opportunity to engage participants with a variety of Cuban documentary films on education, politics, and society.

Maria Caridad is a film critic and programmer. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Havana’s Department of Art History and the Fundacion del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano (FNCL), where she teaches courses in Latin American and Cuban film. Her book, Latitudes del Margen: El Cine Latinoamericano Ante el Tercer Milenio, co-authored with Joel del Rio, was awarded a special jury prize from the FNCL and the Elcala de Henares University (Spain). She co-ordinates the popular website http://www.cinelatinoamericano.org

On March 24, 2959, the Cuban Institute of Cinematographic Art and Industry (ICAIC) became the first cultural institution created by the revolutionary government. Over the past 50 years, the ICAIC has used film as a mass medium of education in the transformation of Cuban politics and culture with special attention to the historical themes themes related to recent heroic struggles. The role of film in Cuba’s national development is the story of how the cultural institution of ICAIC mediated a social revolution and reflected/projected a new “sensorium,” primarily through its production and exhibition of documentaries, feature films and weekly newsreels.

The Cuba Working Group is sponsored by the Jackman Humanities Institute

CARIBBEAN STUDIES AT NEW COLLEGE Fall 2009 Events

September 17, 2009

CARIBBEAN STUDIES AT NEW COLLEGE
FALL TERM EVENTS, 2009
ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Workshop with Etienne Charles (Assistant Professor, College of Music, Michigan State University)
http://www.etiennecharles.com
DATE: September 18th
PLACE: Boyd Neel Room, Edward Johnson Building, Faculty of Music, 80 Queen’s Park TIME:
12 – 2 p.m.
Born in the island of Trinidad and Tobago in 1983, young trumpeter Etienne Charles –
whose musical lineage runs at least four generations deep – defies easy musical
categorization. He is a graduate of the world-renowned Juilliard School of Music in New York City, where he received a full scholarship to pursue his Master’s degree. He has performed and recorded in many musical genres with a range of Grammy award winning musicians that include Roberta Flack, Wynton Marsalis, the Count Basie Orchestra, Marian Schneider, as well as with David Rudder, Monty Alexander, Lord Blakie, Marcus Roberst and Rene Marie. He has just released his second album, Folklore. Etienne Charles, who like his father Francis Charles was once a member of Phase II, one of the island’s most progressive steelbands, stands at the vanguard of a new generation of musicians who are from the Caribbean but are not totally of it, in terms of a fresh and broad-ranging artistic vision, and in the myriad influences encompassed in their soundscape.earles stands at the vanguard of a new generation of musicians who are from the Caribbean but are not totally of it, in terms of a fre***sh and bro****

Norman Girvan (Professor at the Institute of International Relations of the University of the West Indies, and former Secretary General of the Association of Caribbean States) and Yash Tandon, Former Executive Director of the South Centre, Geneva and the Founding Director of the Southern and Eastern African Trade Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI)
TITLE: Roundtable on the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA): Lessons for Africa and the
Caribbean

DATE: October 6th

PLACE: 208N Munk Centre, 1 Devonshire Place
TIME: 4:30 – 6 p.m.
Jointly sponsored with African Studies
*****

Film Screening: The Harder They Come
To be followed by a panel discussion, moderated by Professor Christian Campbell,
Department of English
DATE: Friday October 16th
PLACE: William Doo Auditorium, 45 Willcocks St.
TIME: 6:30 p.m.
*****

Yarimar Bonilla, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Virginia
TITLE: Open Undergraduate Seminar: The Non-Independent Caribbean and the Question of
Sovereignty
DATE: October 22nd
PLACE: WI2002, New College, 40 Willcocks St.
TIME: 12-2 p.m.
*****

Yarimar Bonilla, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Virginia, TITLE:
“Reinventing Marronage: Epistemologies of Labor and Resistance in Guadeloupe”
DATE: October 23rd
PLACE: History Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Sidney Smith Building, 100 St. George Street
TIME: 2-4 p.m.
*****

Annual Conference: Racism and National Consciousness
CONFERENCE THEME: Land and Freedom
DATE: October 31st
PLACE: Wetmore Dining Hall New College, 21 Classic Avenue
TIME: 9 – 6 p.m.
CONFIRMED KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Dr. Maria Paiz
Victor (Venezuelan scholar and social activist), Omali Yeshitella Chairman, the African
Peoples Socialist Movement (Florida).
PANEL DISCUSSIONS: Aboriginal Peoples in Canada and the US in relation to land and
freedom, and the situation of Tamils in Sri Lanka, Pakistan and
Afghanistan.
BOOK LAUNCH: The White Supremacist State – Eurocentrism, Imperialism, Colonialism,
Racism. Edited by Arnold Itwaru, Senior Lecturer, New College. With essays by 10
scholars, all of whom have presented at the Annual Conference on Racism and National
Consciousness during the past 7 years (Ella Shohat, Sunera Thobani, Henry Giroux, Julia
Sudbury, Nandita Sharma, Lorne Foster, Marainne Vardalos, Natasha Ksonzek, Ward
Churchill, Arnold Itwaru)

*****

Film Screening (title to be confirmed)
DATE: Friday November 6th
PLACE: William Doo Auditorium, 45 Willcocks Street
TIME: 6:30 p.m.

*****

Bernardine Evaristo, UK
Reading from Blonde Root (UK: Hamilton/Penguin), a dazzling, imaginative reversal of the
transatlantic slave trade in which Africans are the masters and Europeans are their
slaves. http://www.bevaristo.net/

DATE: November 13th
PLACE: William Doo Auditorium, 45 Willcocks St.
TIME: 6:30 p.m.
Jointly sponsored with African Studies

*****

Ralph Premdas, Professor of Public Policy, University of the West Indies, Trinidad &
Tobago, and visiting scholar, Ethnic and Pluralism Studies, University of Toronto
(2009-2010).
Date, Time and Title TBA.
Jointly sponsored with Ethnic and Pluralism Studies

End of Summer Social [Sept 12]

September 5, 2009

A Workshop with Etienne Charles (Assistant Professor, College of Music, Michigan State

September 4, 2009

The Faculty of Music and Caribbean Studies at New College, University of Toronto present

DATE: September 18th
PLACE: Boyd Neel Room, Edward Johnson Building, Faculty of Music, 80 Queen’s Park
TIME: 12 – 2 p.m.
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. ALL WELCOME.

poster vertBorn in the island of Trinidad and Tobago in 1983, young trumpeter Etienne Charles –whose musical lineage runs at least four generations deep – defies easy musical categorization. He is a graduate of the world-renowned Juilliard School of Music in New York City, where he received a full scholarship to pursue his Master’s degree. He has
performed and recorded in many musical genres with a range of Grammy award winning musicians that include Roberta Flack, Wynton Marsalis, the Count Basie Orchestra, Marian Schneider, as well as with David Rudder, Monty Alexander, Lord Blakie, Marcus Roberst and Rene Marie. He has just released his second album, Folklore. Etienne Charles, who like his father Francis Charles was once a member of Phase II, one of the island’s most progressive steelbands, stands at the vanguard of a new generation of musicians who are from the Caribbean but are not totally of it, in terms of a fresh and broad-ranging artistic vision, and in the myriad influences encompassed in their soundscape.

LEFT OF KARL MARX: THE POLITICAL LIFE OF BLACK COMMUNIST CLAUDIA JONES

May 5, 2009

Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones

Registration Form: CSGN Seminar

April 27, 2009

Download Here: registrationform_csgn_summer_2009_final

CSGN Summer Seminar Series 2009 [Toronto]

April 17, 2009

csgn-recruitment-flyerfinal-1

More Media on the Caribbean Studies undergraduate conference

April 16, 2009

http://www.sharenews.com/local-news/2009/04/1re-their-research

4/undergrads-get-chance-sha

April 16, 2009 “Interpretation on Trial: Linguistic Issues Inside the Jamaican Courtroom”

April 7, 2009

DLLL LECTURE SERIES IN LINGUISTICS AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS

Ross S 562 – Thursday April 16 at 5:00 York University

“Interpretation on Trial: Linguistic Issues inside the Jamaican Courtroom”
Professor Clive Forrester
(DLLL York University/University of the West Indies at Mona)
There is no shortage of researchers who demonstrate that when “cultural minorities” enter the courtroom space communicative problems are likely to arise. The communicative problems can be divided into two broad categories – linguistic, and discourse related. Linguistic problems may include, but are not limited to, the types of problems which arise when a defendant or witness does not speak the language of the courtroom and an interpreter is required. Researchers such as Berk-Seligson (2002), Hale (2004), and Mason (2008) have all done studies in this area. Discourse related issues are of the types which occur when the defendant or witness is unfamiliar with the communicative norms inside the courtroom (such as, for example, the rigid question and answer format). Those issues have been thoroughly documented in work done by Eades (2000), Moeketski (1999), and Feiner (1997) to name a few. There are some courtroom scenarios however, where defendants and witnesses encounter both linguistic and discourse problems. The Jamaican courtroom is one such space.
This paper seeks to explore the types of communicative problems which are likely to arise inside the Jamaican courtroom when the lay witness takes the stand. The paper uses three important elements as a background to the discussion; (a) the linguistic and discourse reality of the average defendant inside the courtroom (b) an ignorance of this situation and (c) how the complex system of courtroom interaction magnifies the problem. Several examples of potential misinterpretation are highlighted from actual court transcripts and the extent to which these ultimately form a part of the final verdict is explored.

Small reception to follow in DLLL Lounge! All welcome!